Random Thoughts From A Middle School Dance

This weekend I volunteered to be the DJ at Middle School Fundraiser dance for a group that my daughter is a part of.  I’ve DJ’ plenty of dances before but most were wedding receptions for friends.

At none of them did I have to worry about the content of the songs. This weekend was different.  “Paradise By The Dashboard Lights, Strokin, and Save A Horse (Ride a Cowboy)” are crowd favorites… just not appropriate for 6th, 7th, and 8th graders.

The job was even more difficult because I don’t listen to much pop music.  I’m a country music kinda guy and when I’m not listening to that it’s all Christian rock.  With the help of a high schooler and some other parent volunteers I think we did a good job of keeping them dancing and having fun.

Over the course of the 2 hours I think we only let one “questionable” song through and we bailed on it when we caught it.  Now for some random thoughts and observations on the night:

Technology sure has made DJ’ing easier.  I used to have to lug around crates of CD’s and hope they didn’t skip.  This time I used a laptop… and with Google Play Music All Access every song you could ever want was just a mouse click away.

Middle School dances haven’t changed much since I was a kid.  The dance floor was scattered with distinct groups.

“Thriller” and “YMCA” will get everyone dancing no matter what age they are.

Some of the popular songs of today are hard to dance to but when they were the kids didn’t mind.  Instead of dancing they’d sway as a group and sing along.  “Wrecking Ball” would be a good example.

As awkward as I remember dancing with a girl in middle school was it’s just as awkward to watch.  Girls hands on guys shoulders.  Guys hands on girls hips.  A foot of space between the two.  No eye contact or conversation.  Just a robotic sway side-to-side.

Hormones will make a young guy say some funny stuff.  Like the one who came up about 30 minutes before the end of the dance and said, “I was thinking we should end the night with a couple of slow songs”.

Although at times it was frustrating… it was a fun night.  The biggest victory?  My daughter said I didn’t embarrass her.

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Our Own Nexus 7 Commercial

Google could have filmed a Nexus 7 commercial at our house this weekend. For a 3rd grade project my daughter (with a parental help) had to turn a shoe box into a habitat complete with animals and vegetation.

Along with it she had to prepare a “food web” showing the animals she included and what each ate. She chose to do a rainforest.

Together we searched Amazon on the N7 for the perfect toy animals to use and ordered them right from Amazon app.  She used the N7 for research.

It would have taken her forever to figure out how to spell and type what she wanted to look up on the computer. Instead she became a pro at saying, “OK Google. What does a tapir eat” and “show me pictures of rainforest plants”.

To round out the complete N7 experience we used it to take and crop this picture.

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My daughter did 100% of the research, painting, and animal placement.  I was there mostly for moral support, to cut the box, and run the hot glue gun.

Yep.  I can picture the Google/Nexus 7 commercial in my head.  What a fun memory this will be for both of us.

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Don’t Blame Dave Ramsey… Look at the Face in the Mirror

Around Thanksgiving time Dave Ramsey shared a blog post titled 20 Things the Rich Do Every Day.  It was from Tom Corley’s website.  This list poses an interesting juxtaposition of the daily habits of the rich and the poor.  It has also created plenty of internet and Twitter backlash for Dave.  Many are using it to accuse Dave of hating the poor.

My wife and I are Dave Ramsey listeners.  We recently completed his Financial Peace University.  Anyone who has ever taken this course or listened to his show should realize that Dave doesn’t hate the poor.  He helps and encourages them.  That’s how he’s built his business and his brand.

Instead of blaming Dave we should all take that list of 20 things and look in the mirror.  As I read through it my thoughts weren’t, “Wow, Dave!  You’re being a little hard on the poor.”  Instead, my thoughts went immediately to which habits of mine I could change to be more like the rich.  There were five that practically jumped off the screen and slapped me across the face.  Little changes in behavior and attitude that could possibly help me win financially and definitely improve the quality of life for me (and my family).

If you haven’t read it yet perhaps you should read the list and see if there are any habits you might change.

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